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Vaping Concerns Drive Interest in Edibles

With the recent issues relating to vaping deaths in the US and illnesses reported in Canada, consumers are rethinking their consumption habits.

New Ipsos research uncovered 63% of cannabis users are somewhat or very concerned about the safety of vaping. This concern may lead them towards the edible market. Recent Ipsos data found 73% of cannabis users say they are definitely or likely to use a cannabis edible or beverage instead of vaping cannabis. There is a significant amount of pent-up demand for cannabis edibles among existing cannabis users, with 90% of current users indicating that they will try a cannabis edible or beverage, once it is legally available.

Though currently only available in the black market, most Canadian cannabis users (70%) admit they have already sampled a cannabis edible or drink. And, the feedback is promising for the edible industry. 82% told Ipsos that their most recent consumption experience of a cannabis edible or drink was a positive one. This runs contrary to a big worry of many industry observers, that negative experiences with cannabis edibles or beverages could steer consumers away from this new product format.

“The serious vaping health concerns in the US have occurred at the perfect time when looking at it from the cannabis edible launch perspective,” says Ipsos’ Michael Rodenburgh, Executive VP and Lead for Ipsos’ Cannabis Consulting Team. “Those concerns have created greater interest, [which] the edibles market likely would not have seen otherwise, as users look to try new formats that have fewer health consequences and are more accessible for use in social environments. Edibles are poised to capitalize on these issues as Canada’s cannabis industry matures. Consumers of cannabis are telling us that edibles offer benefits that combustion can’t offer by eliminating the second-hand smoke and the smell that can negatively affect others.”

Consumers can expect to see a limited line of products on store shelves starting December 17th. Because of processing and packaging, the cost is expected to be higher than traditional cannabis, but that should not be a big deterrent for users.

Photo courtesy of Jonathan J. Castellon